Securing our Assets

pabloI’ve about reached the point in believing that we have no chance in securing our personal information technology assets (home network, computer, mobile phone, tablet) etc.

There are simple steps we can all take to secure our equipment and network, but they are likely just not enough. I’ve done several communications sessions with family and friends and others to discuss how they can best protect their equipment. I wrote about that on my security page.  I just keep reading about more risks, threats and how organized those who want in are and what capabilities they are bringing to bear to get access where they don’t belong.

Is it time to start disconnecting more? Should we have a computer at home that only occasionally is connected to the network, even if that helps at all? Updates now require network connections so it is almost unavoidable.

Keep all the firmware and software up-to-date on all our devices and that requires network connectivity again. But are all these updates secure, tested and safe? Of course they aren’t all safe. We are unsafe with the flaws in our existing devices and we are unsafe with the updates that add more flaws or new flaws. What to do?

Maybe a simple mobile phone that only does calls and text messages? But that can be hijacked and listened to as 60 minutes has told us.

All our technology (Watch, tablet, laptops, Kindle, Apple TV, Netflix, etc.) require network connectivity. What to do?

What about our parents and friends who are not that computer literate?

I want to watch Stranger Things on Netflix and that requires a lot of technology on my end be up-to-date and working. What to do?

 

3 thoughts on “Securing our Assets”

  1. 100% safe option is to have devices disconnected from the internet (not home wi-fi) but the the dream of IoT remains a dream. I started worrying about this after I got a google home device – which is sitting there waiting to listen for the “Hey Google” or “Hi Google” phrase. You wonder what all is is reporting and what happens if this gets hacked!

    1. Perfect example. Another device we allow in and we don’t know what the risks are with it and what risks might appear with the next upgrade. Arghhh. Thanks for stopping by.

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